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house, they are already doing things with technology innovation. he is coming here to us -- to spotlight the kinds of things he is talking about how colleges can lower the cost and still maintain a good education. he will start here and then go to a high school in syracuse. as you mentioned, this is all part of a larger strategy based on what he calls the middle class programs. over the past several weeks he has given several speeches on different aspects of the programs. he talked about housing and of other city. he says education is the key to middle-class. are college graduate, a better class of entering the economy and making more of an income. even on top of that, he was on vacation last week, now getting back to the real grind. we're heading into september where we will look at budgets. the fiscal year ends september 30 and the temporary spending bill ends on september 30. if the president and congress cannot agree on a new spending plan, the government will shut down. i think you are also hearing him make his pitch for how we should handle the budget going forward. for the proposa
schools and be ready in the science and technology or other fields of that era? will they be able to interact, appreciate and love and more diverse setting than we've ever seen before? our job today is for the answer and 2029 to be not just, yes we can, but yes, we did. it is now my honor to introduce the mayor of our great city and county of san francisco, and lee. i've known him and admired him since his days as a civil rights attorney at the asian law caucus. mayor lee has worked hard to keep the economy and economic recovery on track. to create jobs for our residents. mayor lee keeps his focus on making san francisco a city that celebrates diversity and leads the way in job creation innovation, education, healthcare, and the environment for future generations. mayor lee began his career in civil rights as a community activist. he later served as director of our san francisco human rights commission fighting for people who weren't able to have their voices heard. now as mayor, he continues the fight closing people i implement programs and services that help our most vulnerable
unfree. and over some number of decades became much for your and much were democratic. >> does technology eventually make democracy inevitable? >> one of the observations that we can with actually came from me and mark. we were in the mr a little over a month ago, less than 1% as access to the unit. one of the worst decade shift in the entire world. now it's in some country and session. still very much speculative about whether its democratic transition. what was interesting about myanmar and perhaps something that shocked even us is even the less than 1% of the population has access to the internet everyone had heard of it. they understood the unit as a set of values, as a concept as an id even before they experienced it as a user or a tool. the understanding was not based on a chinese interpretation but it was not based on autocrats version. they understood in terms of its western value of the free flow of information and civil liberties. what that means to us is your 57% of the world's population living under some kind of an autocracy. what happens when they try to create an autocratic
mostly by how different things are now. the technology is such a you can get a flash mob to show up if you want but 1963 you get 200,000 people back to the mall and you would be below horned. organizing was remarkable and that to me -- i would like people to understand the enormity of that. >> a very short time a group of people came together because they believe in something. and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> on the march on washington to go forward but the young people who want to be journalists tuesday that they have an obligation to cover poverty, to cover race, to go deeper and find the real story. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we would rather be here. >> will be on line. >> look at it and see the people that came to the march. these are ordinary men and women dressed like they are going to church and they believe they are going to church. >> i think that the world came together around an idea that all men, and we soon added women and children, gay lesbian and children are created equal so it cr
nascar fan and media engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. >>> finger pointing and name calling. that's been the game between the nasdaq and new york stock exchange since last thursday. now the federal government is demanding hard answers. >> the two exchanges are blaming one another for the destruction and now the securities and exchange commission heard enough. its head mary jo white demanding they meet september 12th to give a clear picture of exactly what happened. what's on the line at the meeting and what's the future of these exchanges? with us, david wield, former vice chairman and chris nagy, served on the board of the philadelphia stock exchange and amex option s exchanges. william. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> from your perspective, how important is the nasdaq prove it's not at fault jmplt you c? >> you can look at the structure. both at fault in some way. blaming the markets isn't particularly productive. they've become so complicated, some respects
that technology is moving so quick that at some point does the technology out pace the laws that are in place. i'm very confident knowing the nsa and how they operate that purposely somebody is out there trying to abuse this program or listen in. >> you're confident? >> i am confident about that. what i recognize is that we're going to be have to continue to improve the safety guards and as technology comes we build technology to give people more assurance an we have to do a better job of giving people confidence in how these programs work. i'm open to working with congress to figure out can we get more transparency in how the oversight court works. do we need a public advocate in there? are there addition flal respoal be taken. the but, do it in way that americans know their proobasic privacies are being protected. we have some hostile folks out there that are trying to do us harm. >> i want to bring in candy crow lee. can he have it both ways? recognize that we're making mistakes but trust us any way? >> reporter: there is every time another one of these revelation comes out and heaven only kn
center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. (announcer) at scottrade, our cexactly how they want.t with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. awarded five-stars from smartmoney magazine. and this is my home team. this is my large lecture hall. this is my professor. and also my coach. this is my booster club. this is the guy who's graduating ready for a great career in technology. [ male announcer ] in 2012, 90% of devry university grads actively seeking employment had careers in their field in 6 months. join the 90%. learn how at devry.edu. time to have new experiences with a familiar keyboard. to update our status without opening an app. to have all our messages in one place. to browse... and share... f
and american companies can take a -- take a vintage. looking at technologies new methods of doing business but not just high-tech look get the shakes jack they have done something different waiting in line $1 for a burger. it is called innovation. also execution. you did have the greatest team in the world but updated on how to play together or a manager to make them play together, they will not win. management can navigate all kinds of economies in the ability to take market share , the ability to do great things. those are things that you want. takes more time to find this but when new do, yosleep better. forget about the p-e ratio. we do want to have fun because he learned the importance of the global economy and why it is important. here is a quiz. do you know, what city this is? i also posted a picture earlier of my twitter feed. tweet me if you think you know, the swer and i will give you a few clues. 4 million people, a big luxury hotel destination area, four seasons just open and the main engine of growth is not wheel that i will reveal the winner in to you by this picture is wor
technology that would produce the steel for less than half the price. these big ingots take specialties that can be used in high-tech industries. they got the money together, they converted, and they are the fifth largest steel company in employees.0 the average pay was $85,000 a year. it never made it to television. i believe we lost the election in that moment. there were other, institutional reasons why we did not do it. we have to understand those and make sure it does not happen again. the romney campaign was out of money because they spent it all in the primary. they had a lot of money earmarked for the general election and they could not spend it until after the republican convention. all of the money could not be spent except for a portion of it on political communication. they've ran negative issue ads against obama tom a -- against obama, but they never felt able to answer the bain capital for fear of the tax exempt status. i kept telling them the irs would cut you slack.but those accountants did not believe me. let's make sure we don't make the same mistake again because we c
your kids to do well in school. >> i am mostly struck by how different things are now. the technology is such that you can get it -- mob to show up and dance in the middle of pennsylvania avenue if you wanted but to get 253,000 people against the mall, there would be old horns, pulpits, it was remarkable and to me, i would like for young people to understand the enormity of what it took to do that. >> and a very short time, a group of people came together because they believed in something and they put together the most unbelievable moment in american history. >> for the legacy on the march in washington to go or word, to the young people who want to be see thatts, to really they have an obligation to cover poverty, cover race, go deeper to find the real story. >> julian. >> we are missing the pbs video documentary on the march tonight because we have to be here. >> but it will be online. [laughter] the march,came to ordinary men and women dressed like they're going to church because many believe they were going to church. >> andrew. >> the world came together around an idea that all
's god's will. >> reporter: though the amish typically shy away from modern technology, sarah hershberger's father agreed to do a phone interview. her parents initially agreed to chemo. after a month, the tumors shrunk. but the side effects became too much for her to handle. >> if we do chemotherapy and she would happen to die, she would probably suffer more than if we would do it this way. and she would happen to die. >> reporter: so, in june, they stopped the treatment. with chemotherapy, her doctors say she has an 85% chance of survival. without it, she could die within a year. in july, the hospital took the family to court, seeking temporary guardianship. in a statement to abc news, the hospital attorney, lobbying to take over sarah's care says, i believe there can be no doubt that it is in her best interest to have chemotherapy and have a chance to live a full life. >> the state's interest in protecting the child's life is going to be considered compelling. and at the end of the day, i think that it's going to override the parents' rights. >> reporter: for "good morning america," ale
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of technology and the george washington university. to my far right, again, only in geography, andrew young. he was a close aide to dr. martin luther king. he helped organize the march on washington. he was a former congressman, mayor of atlanta, and ambassador to the united nations. he is currently a professor at the andrew young school of policy studies at your estate university. to my left, gwen ifill, reporter and managing editor of pbs's washington week. she has covered seven presidential campaigns, moderated two vice presidential debates. before that, she worked for nbc, the new york times, and the washington post. in this business, she is regarded as one of the best. to my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement while a student at morehouse college. he helped found the student nonviolent coordinating committee. in 1998, he was elected chairman of the naacp, the national association for the advancement of colored people. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television commentator and is currently a professor at both ameri
are not succeeding, if we are not spending on research and maintain our technological edge, if we are not upgrading our roads and bridges and our transportation and infrastructure, all things we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right things we don't do those in 20 years from now or 30 years from now we will have fallen behind. host: that is during course of president obama's college tour. the numbers are on the screen. on twitter -- you can make your thoughts on the phone line as well. as far as the political strategy is concerned, thecleveland.com says -- phone lines are available, -- they mentioned the strategy behind this. the wall street journal story picks up on that. eric cantor said -- caller: i got a call from the republican party asking me to contribute money. i told the woman to stop reading from the script and i asked her a bunch of questions, such as why is boehner a political coward? why won't he fight obamacare? why won't he defund it? i have no use for the republican party anymore. . theyre afraid of obama are afraid of being calle
of judging and handling cases how technological advances impact the role of judges and i think of a particular interest the district of columbia case it is a strong book. >> host: is it intellectual? >> guest: and the judge is right seeing very accessible and it does point in his career reflecting on his career of the position he has had it is meant for a general audience. >> what is one other book you want to share? >> it is called the collaboration and we're looking forward to this book because he has gone dry rock -- the archives and tells the story of hillers influence on hollywood 33 through 40 and a couple of things that not just hiller's influence of hollywood editing films wednesday that sentiment edited out and to have the films they and but not just in the german market but it is interesting favorite have this influence on the film house but it would matter a great lead to them put it to impact the film that were here in the united states and globally. >> host: that is a preview of some of the books coming out by a harvard university press this fall. >>. >> the buildi
and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow, and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision. >> the landscape is littered with dashed dreams and lost hopes of all races. the ironry is the future never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become. if we push open those stubborn gates. and if we do it together. the choice remains as it was on that distant summer day 50 years ago, cooperate and thrive or fight with each other and fall behind. we should all thank god for dr. king and john lewis, and all those who gave us a dream to guide us, a dream they made for like our founders with their lives, their fortunes, their sacred honor. and we thank them for reminding us that america is always becoming, always on a journey, and we all, every single citizen among us, have to run our lap. god bless them,ed , and god bles america. >> of course, for
costs and lengthen lives. nor can we stop investing in science and technology to train our young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow. and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climate. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision in the voting rights act because, look at the states. it made it harder for african-americans and hispanics and students and the elderly and the infirmed and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [ applause ] but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. we must open those stubborn gates. and let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with the lost dreams and dashed hopes of people of all races. and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never
just months after microsoft announced a broad restructuring plan to capitalize on mobile technology, tamron. >>> jackie, thank you. caught on camera, a motorcyclist meets his match on a canadian highway. take a look at this. a bear runs across the road. not a chicken but a bear. the motorcyclist could not avoid it. it happened in vancouver. the helmet camera video was just released by the police. the bear ran away unharmed. the motorcyclist will be okay as well. that is incredible. it's now 7:09, matt and savannah. we always say what happens when the chicken crossed the road? what happens when it's a bear? >> there's going to be a pun. >> do you know what i was thinking, beary scary. >> i'm a teenager at heart because of one direction. >> you're a 4th grader. >> all right tamron, thank you very much. al's not even going to comment on that. >> there's 7,000 people out here. there was crickets during that joke. unbelievable stuff. but look at this crowd. it is crazy. they're here at one of the biggest intersections in america and look at this. all the way across here to 30 rockefeller
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
engagement center. hp's technology helps us turn millions of tweets, posts and stories into real-time business insights that help nascar win with our fans. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy? >>> and that does it for this edition of "andrea mitchell reports." tomorrow we'll drive you live from it the historic 50th anniversary of the celebration of the march on washington. my colleague richard lui has a look at what's next on "news neig nation." >> thank you so much. in our next hour, ramping up. the u.s. could launch air strikes against syria as early as thursday. the pentagon says it's ready and is just waiting for the president to pull the trigger. the military options the u.s. is likely considering. plus, the effect this crisis is having on world markets. >>> and an investigat
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need to get our arms around it. >> it's a big part of the disconnect between human life and technology. martha: we're going to talking talking -- to be talking about this a lot more. gregg: new debate about bradley manning's bombshell announcement that he plans to live the rest of his life as a woman and who, if anyone, should pay for his hormone treatments while he serves his 35-year prison sentence. too small. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. inspired by perfection. new creamy alfredo soup. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. martha: holy "batman," the wait is over, folks. ben affleck, who has made quite a comeback in recent years, is taking the role of the dark
to those who are with it today. we're in a high technological society. these people go out of work. they don't have the background and experience because they haven't lived. i see that as my role, being that support system to helping to educate them to the things that happened than. i think it was something that was badly needed in america not only for those in attendance but those who could hear and see on television and to send a message to washington, to the state houses, to the local levels that the movement is still alive. and we have to believe that, and we have to act on it. i'm one of the old citizens of the time. i could not help but reflect on things such as the fact that we were not allowed -- people of color were not allowed on television shows. we did hold places in government. i used the theme that had such a negative connotation, stand your ground. i hope i got over to the crowd we need to seize that and use it as our own in a positive way. stand our ground for what we believe, for what we have worked and for what we have died for and move forward. >> it's a reclamat
were born on third base. enjoying freedom, opportunity, technology, things fought bygiven to you the struggles and the sacrifices those who came before and don't you forget where you have come from. you drank deeply from wells of and om and liberty opportunity that you did tphnot dig. you ate lavishly from tables ancestors.y your we and my generation cannot now consuming allback of our blessings thinking that achieved freedom. the truth of the matter is that still demands that the oral conscience of our country still calls us, that hope still needs heroes. understand that there is still work to do. hen the leading cause of death for black men my age and younger is gun violence we still have to do. when we still have a justice treats the economically disadvantaged and minorities different than others have work to do. america work a full-time job plus overtime and stifling line the of poverty, we still have work to do. when we see wages stagnating, when child poverty is the rich are en getting richer and the poor are millions ofer, when our children are living in neighborhoods wher
not gather in the hotel in washington d.c. who did not have the technology or the tools that we had our who could that imagine having a black president or black attorney general. they did not turn back and we cannot either. we are so blessed because god is on our side. we're so blessed to be here together. we're so blessed to have leadership together we will keep moving forward when it comes to fight for justice. we cannot and we will not, we shall not be moved in our struggles that it is a reality. thank you so much. [applause] >> i told you. [laughter] >> when she was walking down the steps she said that was my low voice. [laughter] it is always a pleasure to hear her speak. but you will recognize the name and maybe the face with the work they she does she is the head of the largest national civil-rights in the u.s. ahead of national council and what she did was along with their partners they worked a and registered for that election, as some two to thousand new hispanic voters so please give a warm welcome. [applause] >> hello. thank you all and i especially want to think there durbin be
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)